Portfolio

Art Gallery

Portfolio

We have varied collection in Madhubani, Pattachitra, Rajasthani, Warli and Phad.

Madhubani painting is one of the many famous Indian art forms. As it is practiced in the Mithila region of Bihar and Nepal, it is called Mithila or Madhubani art. Often characterized by complex geomet... Read More rical patterns, these paintings are known for representing ritual content for particular occasions, including festivals, religious rituals, etc. The colors used in Madhubani paintings are usually derived from plants and other natural sources. These colors are often bright and pigments like lampblack and ochre are used to create black and brown respectively. Instead of contemporary brushes, objects like twigs, matchsticks and even fingers are used to create the paintings. Over time, Madhubani paintings became a part of festivities and special events like weddings. Slowly, this art attracted connoisseurs of art as many contemporary Indian artists took the art on global stage. The traditional base of plastered mud wall was soon replaced by handmade paper, cloth and canvas. Madhubani paintings were initially practiced by different sects of people and hence the paintings were categorized into five different styles, such as Tantrik, Kohbar, Bharni, Godna, Katchni. But today, these five different styles have been merged by contemporary artists. - www.culturalindia.net Read Less
Pattachitra or Patachitra is a general term for traditional, cloth-based scroll painting, based in the eastern Indian states of Odisha and West Bengal. Pattachitra art form is known for its intricate ... Read More details as well as mythological narratives and folktales inscribed in it.-Wikipedia Patta in Hindi means leaf, whereas chitra means picture. The artists of these pictures are called “Chitrakars” Making the patta is the first thing that comes in the agenda, and the painters, also called chitrakars, go about their work in preparing a tamarind paste, which is made by soaking tamarind seeds in water for three days. The seeds are later pounded with a crusher, mixed with water, and heated in an earthen pot to turn it to a paste, which is called niryas kalpa. The paste is then used to hold two pieces of cloth together with it, and coated with a powder of soft clay stone a couple of times till it becomes firm. Soon as the cloth becomes dry, the final touch of polishing it with a rough stone and then a smooth stone or wood is given, until the surface becomes smooth and leathery, and is all ready as a canvas to be painted on. The gum of the kaitha tree is the chief ingredient, and is used as a base for making different pigments, on which diverse raw materials are mixed for diverse colours. Powdered conch shells, for instance, are used for making a white pigment, while lamp soot is used for a black pigment. The root of the keya plant is usually used for making the common brush, while mouse hair is used on the requirement of finer brushes, to be attached to wooden handles. A single Pattachitra painting takes at least five to 15 days, while some even taking months to complete. The timing to carve one Pattachitra painting depends upon the level of intricacy and size of the paintings. However, it takes years of practice, dedication and skill for an artisan to carve a flawless and magnificent piece.Read Less
Phad painting is a style religious paintings done on scrolls of cloth and later paper, practiced in Rajasthan India. This style of painting is traditionally done on a long piece of cloth or canvas, ... Read More known as phad. The narratives of the folk deities of Rajasthan, mostly of Pabuji and Devnarayan are depicted on the phads. The Bhopas,or bards ,traditionally carry the painted phads along with them and use these as the mobile temples of the folk deities, who are worshipped by the Rebari community of the North west region of the country. Traditionally the phads are painted with vegetable colors. In 1960, Shree Lal Joshi opened a school called 'Joshi Kala Kendra' for everyone to learn this art style. Presently, the school is called 'Chitrashala'. These paintings were done on very long scrolls in the earlier days but now have been reduced to 3 or 4 feet to make it more practical, Vivid reds and bold outlines in black are a feature of these phads.Read Less
Rajashtani School of art One of the oldest and most recognized Art forms of India. These paintings are done with utmost care and in minute details, with strong lines and bold colours set in harmon... Read More ious patterns. The miniature artists use paper, ivory panels, wooden tablets, leather, marble, cloth and walls for their paintings. Indian artists employed multiple perspectives unlike their European counterparts in their paintings. The colours are made from minerals and vegetables, precious stones, as well as pure silver and gold. The preparing and mixing of colour is an elaborate process. It takes weeks, sometimes months, to get the desired results. The brushes are required to be very fine, and to get high-quality results, brushes even to this very day are made from hair of squirrels. Traditionally, the paintings are aristocratic, individualistic and strong in portraiture, where the plush court scenes and hunting expedition of royalty are depicted. Flowers and animals are also the recurrent images in the paintings. - archive.india.gov.in These paintings have followed history over the years and infused the images into various medium.Read Less
The tradition of Warli Painting in Maharashtra are among the finest examples of folk style of paintings. The Warli tribe is one of the largest in India, located outside of Mumbai. Despite being close ... Read More to one of the largest cities in India, the Warli reject much of contemporary culture. These rudimentary wall paintings use a set of basic geometric shapes: a circle, a triangle, and a square. These shapes are symbolic of different elements of nature. The circle and the triangle come from their observation of nature. The circle represents the sun and the moon, while the triangle is derived from mountains and pointed trees. In contrast, the square appears to be a human invention, indicating a sacred enclosure or a piece of land. The subject of these paintings often stems from religion but soon transgressed into showing life in the village. Personal depictions of the village activities,the indigenous sports and of course the village temple. Easily identifiable by the mud background and lime lines these paintings seem to bring the rural into the urban sphere.Read Less